« California passes jailhouse informant corroboration law | Main | Two films on domestic terrorism to air on PBS this week »

August 02, 2011

Posted by Alexandra Natapoff at 05:24 PM

Report: Confidential Informants in New Jersey

It's rare to get this much data about informant practices. The New Jersey ACLU has released this important study of confidential informant practices across the state, based on scores of documents, cases, interviews, and government policies. According to the study,

The use of informants in drug law enforcement in New Jersey was found to be largely informal, undocumented, and unsupervised, and therefore vulnerable to error and corruption.

Among many findings, the study determined that informant use led to the following problems: manufactured criminal conduct, financial abuse, police coersion, harm to the informants, unreliability, misuse of juveniles, using "big fish" to catch "little fish," and the widespread violation of laws and guidelines. The study proposes reforms, and apparently a number of New Jersey counties have already responded with improved policies.

Snitching by Alexandra Natapoff A Barnes & Noble Best Pick of 2009

2010 ABA Silver Gavel Award Honorable Mention for Books
2010 ABA Silver Gavel Award
Honorable Mention for Books

Related Links

Other Law Blogs and Websites of Interest

Legal Disclaimer

  • Content on this site is for informational purposes only. Snitching Blog does not give legal advice; nothing on this site should be construed as legal advice. Snitching Blog does not warrant the accuracy or currency of any information on this site.
  • Guest bloggers are invited in order to enhance the diversity of information and opinion available on this blog. Their opinions are their own and do not necessarily represent the views of Snitching Blog. Snitching Blog does not endorse any company, private service, or product.